The Fundamentalists Want your Life

women with burka

FUNDAMENTALISTS There are different types of fundamentalists, Christians, Jews, Muslims, Communists, and a whole lot more. This is not a complete list by any means, but sufficient to tell the story. Fundamentalism often has a religious connotation, since the term was originally used by Christians who wanted beliefs to be taken back to their fundamentals. So if the Bible said the world was created in six days, that’s exactly what it meant, no argument. There was no room for evolution, since it was not mentioned in the Bible. This literal belief system resulted in an emphasis on the origin of the beliefs and a rejection of any other opinion or explanation. Fundamentalists, no matter what their beliefs, all have the same characteristics: intolerance for anyone else’s viewpoint; a belief that they are following the only true way; that things must be done exactly as they say; and all people who are not in their sect are grossly mistaken, stupid, or just plain evil. Each sect believe that God has given them specific instructions in their particular “Bible”. The word of God cannot be challenged. And how do we know that it is the word of God? Because their book/ document/… Continue reading

Best Australian books

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 A FORTUNATE LIFE,  A.B. Facey A Fortunate Life is an autobiography by Albert Facey, published in 1981, nine months before his death. It chronicles his early life in Western Australia, his experiences as a private during the Gallipoli campaign of World War I, and his return to civilian life after the war. It also documents his extraordinary life of hardship, loss, friendship and love. During the initial days of its publication, Albert Facey became a nationwide celebrity. Despite his renowned life, Facey considered his life to be simple and “had no idea what all the fuss was about”. When asked on an interview, where the name of the book originated. He replied, “I called it ‘A Fortunate Life’ because I truly believe that is what I had”. After its great reception it has become a classic piece of Australian literature and is one of Australia’s most beloved books. Since its publication in 1981 it has become a primary account of the Australian experience during World War I. Buy paperback from Penguin books ISBN-13: 978-0140081671   GALLIPOLI,  Alan Moorehead When Turkey unexpectedly sided with Germany in World War I, Winston Churchill, as Sea Lord for the British, conceived a plan: smash… Continue reading

Where is our Alternative Donald Trump?

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Nineteen eighty-four by George Orwell Many readers consider this to be one of the most important novels of the 20th century. It sold more than thirty million copies since publication in 1949. Look on GoodReads and you will see it has been given 1,972,594 ratings and 43,570 reviews by readers who rated it 4.13 out of 5. When Donald Trump started talking about “alternative facts” alarm bells began ringing for all those people who had read Nineteen eighty-four. Sales pushed it to the number one spot on Amazon. The novel is fairly simple in plot. It focuses on Winston Smith, in the year 1984 (which was in the future at the time the novel was written.) The world was divided into three super-nations that were continually at war with each other — at least in theory. The story suggests that sometimes, countries bombed their own population while pretending the bombs were coming from an enemy. Thus they could control their population’s emotions; creating a furious hatred of the enemy, loving their own Party who protected them from invasion and death. The Party ruled Great Britain (Airstrip One) by four government ministries. The Ministry of Peace, which dealt with war. The… Continue reading

What I lived for

Joyce carol oates

Fiction by Joyce Carol Oates photo: Larry D. Moore This is a long book, 600 pages of smallish type. Too long, I would say. There are perhaps too many asides, too much remembering, that deter me from a second reading. But make no mistake, this book is great. While I was reading it I kept thinking what other books were in this style: John Dos Passos,  came to mind.   It is a tough book, a man’s book, it out Herod’s Herod: it is written from a male perspective, better than almost any other male writer. This is just staggering; I often wondered if it were not some trick, is Joyce a man, writing as a woman. No woman has ever written a novel like this before, gotten into a man’s skin. Never. Not too many men can.   For me, this book had a number of similarities with John Updike’s Rabbit at Rest . The way it covers so much of American life, society, business, sex, life in general. But Updike’s excellent book is superior, more direct, better fitted together, sweeter, covering more ground. But What I Lived For is up there with the best of the novels. It… Continue reading