Best Australian books

A_Fortunate_Life

 A FORTUNATE LIFE,  A.B. Facey A Fortunate Life is an autobiography by Albert Facey, published in 1981, nine months before his death. It chronicles his early life in Western Australia, his experiences as a private during the Gallipoli campaign of World War I, and his return to civilian life after the war. It also documents his extraordinary life of hardship, loss, friendship and love. During the initial days of its publication, Albert Facey became a nationwide celebrity. Despite his renowned life, Facey considered his life to be simple and “had no idea what all the fuss was about”. When asked on an interview, where the name of the book originated. He replied, “I called it ‘A Fortunate Life’ because I truly believe that is what I had”. After its great reception it has become a classic piece of Australian literature and is one of Australia’s most beloved books. Since its publication in 1981 it has become a primary account of the Australian experience during World War I. Buy paperback from Penguin books ISBN-13: 978-0140081671   GALLIPOLI,  Alan Moorehead When Turkey unexpectedly sided with Germany in World War I, Winston Churchill, as Sea Lord for the British, conceived a plan: smash… Continue reading

– The Top 100 Mystery Novels of All Time –

  According to Mystery Writers of America this is the 1995 list of The Top 100 Mystery Novels of All Time.     Arthur Conan Doyle: The Complete Sherlock Holmes (1887-1927) Dashiell Hammett: The Maltese Falcon (1930) Edgar Allan Poe: Tales of Mystery & Imagination (1852) Josephine Tey: The Daughter of Time (1951) Scott Turow: Presumed Innocent (1987) John le Carré: The Spy Who Came In From the Cold (1963) Wilkie Collins: The Moonstone (1868) Raymond Chandler: The Big Sleep (1939) Daphne du Maurier: Rebecca (1938) Agatha Christie: And Then There Were None (1939) Robert Traver: Anatomy of a Murder (1958) Agatha Christie: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926) Raymond Chandler: The Long Goodbye (1953) James M. Cain: The Postman Always Rings Twice (1934) Mario Puzo: The Godfather (1969) Thomas Harris: The Silence of the Lambs (1988) Eric Ambler: A Coffin for Dimitrios (1939) Dorothy L. Sayers: Gaudy Night (1935) Agatha Christie: The Witness for the Prosecution (1948) * Frederick Forsyth: The Day of the Jackal (1971) Raymond Chandler: Farewell My Lovely (1940) John Buchan: The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915) Umberto Eco: The Name of the Rose (1980) Fyodor Dostoyevsky: Crime and Punishment (1866) Ken Follett: Eye of the Needle (1978)… Continue reading

– Leaving Time by Jodi Picoult –

  This is the first Jodi Picoult novel I have read. It will not be the last, for I found it interesting, informative, and totally absorbing. Jodi Picoult has been prolific, writing over twenty novels during the past twenty years. Not flimsy bodice rippers, but real novels. Leaving Time required an extensive gathering of information to give a solid background of support to the characters. The story is set in both Africa and America, often in elephant sanctuary parks. Most people — myself included — do not know much about elephants apart from the obvious things. In this novel, there is a great deal about elephants; factual information, not so much about their physical attributes, but about their psychology; their grieving for dead calves, their memories of events, and their individual characters. Long before the end of the novel, you will come to be fascinated by the life and character of elephants. The basis of the novel is not about elephants, but about a 13-year-old girl’s search for her mother who abandoned her when she was a three-year-old child. The girl, Jenna, has decided that she will track down her mother, believing her to still be alive, and believing that… Continue reading

– A story of murder, with a part played by Edgar Allan Poe –

The Poet, Michael Connelly. Crime Fiction This is the story of a crime reporter Jack McEvoy, who is told his twin brother, an LA cop, has committed suicide: a bullet to the head while sitting in a parked car, the doors locked. On the inside of the foggy windscreen, written with a finger, is a quote from Edgar Allan Poe. His fellow police officers are convinced that it is suicide. His twin brother, Jack, doesn’t believe it. He begins his own investigation, and soon finds that there has been an extraordinary number of police suicides. As Jack follows up leads, acting the detective, he finds evidence that indicates a cop killer is behind the deaths. Usually there is a suicide note found with the body, the note is a quote from Edgar Allan Poe. The local police try to discourage Jack, they tell him to accept the facts, move on, since they are certain it was suicide and the case is closed. But as Jack McEvoy gathers evidence from different states, the FBI become involved when they discover there is a pattern to the suicide/ murders. Jack and the FBI are now on the trail of “The Poet” who is… Continue reading