Remembrance Day

 Today is Remembrance Day,   November 11 . We are to remember all those who died in war, all those injured, all those who survived. Yet sometimes it seems more like a celebration, a parade. Yes, it’s good that it’s over, but was the war really necessary? Where are the regrets for the war? Wouldn’t it be better to try harder to prevent war? Of course that is no easy task. But war  must always be the last choice. “And if I could, I would send you a bone. Not to call you to war, but away from it. Something you cannot avoid seeing, touching. Something to make the blood on our hands visible, unmistakable. A limb, a shoulder, a hunk of flesh dripping real blood, from the rubble beneath the bulldozer, the doorstep, from the child shot dead in the gunfight or buried under the house, from the bomb shelters of Baghdad and from the bloody busses of Tel Aviv. A bone red with blood to say: This is what colonization requires: blood soaked sand, holy earth defiled with death, human sacrifice.” — STARHAWK Below are two poems from Wilfred Owen, an English soldier, sent off to die in… Continue reading

INTUITION: Keys to Unlocking Your Inner Wisdom, by Paul Fenton-Smith

Not everyone will believe in the subject matter of this book. But those who are open to ideas will find much they can learn. This book covers around forty different topics which are associated with intuition, for example: techniques to centre yourself, psychic protection, seeing auras, clairvoyance, and telepathy. Fenton-Smith keeps a level-headed approach, unlike some of the more popular psychic books. Intuition requires an enquiring mind, that can weigh and consider ideas without immediately accepting or rejecting them. That doesn’t mean everything should be accepted as factual or realistic. Only accept what fits with your inner thoughts after mental examination. Fenton-Smith writes: “The deeper purpose of psychic development is to develop the soul (the psyche) to a point where it can recognise all those viable avenues for nourishment and development. These may include meditation, prayer, gratitude, humility and unity with fellow travellers on the path. Well-developed spiritual reserves of energy are important when we are tested by dismal life circumstances. If we have plentiful reserves of spiritual energy we can rise above physical, emotional or intellectual frustrations.” One of the topics I found interesting was about the future. People often go to psychics wanting to know the future, as… Continue reading

The Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell

book, tipping point

This book is about contagion, how an idea, a product, a book, song, movie, or a phone can suddenly become the item to have. What causes one product to succeed while another fails? The point where an item becomes an overnight success is the “tipping point”. Once you reach the tipping point there is no stopping the flood. It is like the flu virus, up till a certain point, the flu can be contained. Some people are getting over it, as others are coming down with it. That’s the balance point. But if there is a small increase in the number catching the flu, the tipping point is reached, and there is no stopping the contagion until it has burnt itself out. The Tipping Point is a non-fiction book about how that tipping point is achieved. What are the factors that cause one item to reach the tipping point, while a similar item will fail? For something to reach a tipping point it requires some special people: Connectors, Mavens, and Salesmen. Connectors are people with a special gift for bringing people together — connecting them. Connectors know lots of people, but it is important that they are not all within… Continue reading

The Stranger Beside Me, Ann Rule

The Stranger Beside Me, True Crime by Ann Rule Ann Rule began volunteer work at the suicide Crisis Centre after her brother committed suicide. She felt guilt over his death and wanted to do something to help suicidal people. She answered the phone at night and into the early hours of the morning. There were only two people on the night shift, herself and a polite, friendly, empathetic young man who talked people out of suicide. His name was Ted Bundy, probably the worst serial killer in American history. As they worked through the nights, side by side, they became firm friends, despite the fact that Ann Rule was 10 years older, had four children, and was married. Ted was a student at the University of Washington, a psychology major, and an honour student. During quiet nights, they shared aspects of their lives as friends do. No one saw Ted Bundy as a threat, as a killer. What they saw was a charming, intelligent, helpful, friendly young man, universally called “good looking”. In 1971 Ann was a single mother of four, aged 35 years, struggling with a divorce and a sick husband. She had briefly been a police officer, but… Continue reading