INTUITION: Keys to Unlocking Your Inner Wisdom, by Paul Fenton-Smith

Not everyone will believe in the subject matter of this book. But those who are open to ideas will find much they can learn. This book covers around forty different topics which are associated with intuition, for example: techniques to centre yourself, psychic protection, seeing auras, clairvoyance, and telepathy. Fenton-Smith keeps a level-headed approach, unlike some of the more popular psychic books. Intuition requires an enquiring mind, that can weigh and consider ideas without immediately accepting or rejecting them. That doesn’t mean everything should be accepted as factual or realistic. Only accept what fits with your inner thoughts after mental examination. Fenton-Smith writes: “The deeper purpose of psychic development is to develop the soul (the psyche) to a point where it can recognise all those viable avenues for nourishment and development. These may include meditation, prayer, gratitude, humility and unity with fellow travellers on the path. Well-developed spiritual reserves of energy are important when we are tested by dismal life circumstances. If we have plentiful reserves of spiritual energy we can rise above physical, emotional or intellectual frustrations.” One of the topics I found interesting was about the future. People often go to psychics wanting to know the future, as… Continue reading

Against their will

Book cover, Against their will

AGAINST THEIR WILL  is the story of Conscientious Objectors during World War 1 in England. This is a fictional account based on actual events. Conscientious objectors were opposed to the war, seeing it as a war for no purpose, a war based on propaganda, a war about chauvinism and prejudice, a war let loose by the failure of international diplomats. It was not a war to end war, but a war to create animosity and new hatred. Some conscientious objectors opposed it on religious grounds, but they were also treated as though they were aiding the enemy. Those who refused to be conscripted where vilified, cursed as cowards, imprisoned, bashed, tortured, treated as traitors, and sometimes killed in one way or another. There was no sympathy for those who refused to aid the war effort. And yet the C.O.s continued in their opposition to the war, despite the pressure, despite the hatred directed at them. This story has another aspect, that of occultism, Kevin Darwin while in prison, has various psychic experiences. He meets the mysterious Gita Lume, who appears to have uncanny powers and knowledge about his deepest secrets. The army, concerned about the number of conscientious objectors, trialed… Continue reading

Regeneration by Pat Barker

This book is set during WW1 in England. It makes use of the factual poets Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and Robert Graves. Fact and fiction are mixed together in this story about the psychological damage done to soldiers during the First World War. The issue of opposing the war is also discussed, since Siegfried Sassoon, one of the most famous of WW1 poets, opposed the war publicly. Those injured soldiers who opposed the merciless killing were equated with cowards and shirkers. The only apparent option for them was to return to the front in France to demonstrate they were not afraid. When Siegfried Sassoon was wounded in France he returned to England. Wilfred Owen felt he should replace Sassoon at the front so he could report independently on what conditions were like. He returned to France and was killed a week before the end of the war. His mother received the dreaded telegram the same day the church bells were ringing out proclaiming the end of the war. In the novel Regeneration, Rivers is a psychiatrist who treats men who were damaged psychologically by their experiences in the war. The men were often injured mentally as well as physically, yet… Continue reading

Never, never, never give up

NEVER, NEVER, NEVER GIVE UP That is a popular slogan these days. I see it everywhere, but it gives me an uneasy feeling, because I just cannot agree with it. I hope others don’t actually believe it, yet I see it presented  as if it were an infallible truth. There are times when it is best to give up because usually there is a price to pay for not giving up. Let’s look at some examples. During the Second World War, Japan gave up. They did not continue the war after the second atomic bomb was exploded on Nagasaki. What if they had followed the rule, and never, never, never gave up? The bombing would have continued. They didn’t know there were no more atomic bombs, but there were plenty of incendiary bombs, and Japan had no air force by that stage of the war. There was a price to pay for not giving up. The price was the war continuing for perhaps another year, perhaps ten million more civilians would die from bombing, starvation, disease. That was the penalty for never giving up. We should ask the question, never give up … what? Never give up trying to achieve… Continue reading