Where is our Alternative Donald Trump?

Nineteen+Eighty-Four+

Nineteen eighty-four by George Orwell Many readers consider this to be one of the most important novels of the 20th century. It sold more than thirty million copies since publication in 1949. Look on GoodReads and you will see it has been given 1,972,594 ratings and 43,570 reviews by readers who rated it 4.13 out of 5. When Donald Trump started talking about “alternative facts” alarm bells began ringing for all those people who had read Nineteen eighty-four. Sales pushed it to the number one spot on Amazon. The novel is fairly simple in plot. It focuses on Winston Smith, in the year 1984 (which was in the future at the time the novel was written.) The world was divided into three super-nations that were continually at war with each other — at least in theory. The story suggests that sometimes, countries bombed their own population while pretending the bombs were coming from an enemy. Thus they could control their population’s emotions; creating a furious hatred of the enemy, loving their own Party who protected them from invasion and death. The Party ruled Great Britain (Airstrip One) by four government ministries. The Ministry of Peace, which dealt with war. The… Continue reading

— The extraordinary Martha Gellhorn —

Martha Gellhorn is regarded as one of the greatest war correspondents of the 20th century, covering every major world conflict that took place during her 60-year career as a novelist, travel writer, and journalist. Martha Gellhorn was born in November 1908, St. Louis, USA. She enrolled in Bryn Mawr College in Philadelphia, but in 1927, she left before graduating to become a journalist. In 1930 she went to France for two years where she worked at the United Press bureau in Paris. During this period she became active in the pacifist movement and wrote about her experiences in the book, What Mad Pursuit (1934). Back in America, Gellhorn was hired as a field investigator for the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, created by Roosevelt to alleviate the Great Depression. She worked with Dorothea Lange, a photographer, to document the everyday lives of the hungry and homeless. Their reports later became part of the government files on the Great Depression. Gellhorn’s reports for that agency caught the attention of Eleanor Roosevelt, and the two women became lifelong friends. The Trouble I’ve Seen (1936) was her report in the form of four short stories. Its preface was written by H.G. Wells, with whom… Continue reading